Career Development

Every employee thinks about their own career development as they go through their work life. As a trainer/manager, you have hands-on involvement in the way your employees’ career trajectory shapes up. To ensure employees perform to the best of their ability, you need to get the most out of what they have to offer.
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Supporting Career Development

Project managers and human resources personnel in particular deal with career development frequently. They are the ones who are required to dive into the world of performance and career management for their employees. Helping reports to improve is one of the toughest aspects of being a manager and management in general. That’s where a powerful training program can be valuable.

Identify Career Anchors

There are a few different career areas called “anchors,” that people can focus on when looking at their own development. These areas can help people see what the best type of career path is for them, and what things are non-negotiable:

  • Technical/Functional Competence
    The ability to apply skills to technology in the workplace.
  • General Managerial Competence
    Managing and contributing to the organization’s success.
  • Autonomy/Independence
    The ability to define one’s own work and work independently.
  • Security/Stability
    Desiring steady employment and decreased uncertainty.
  • Entrepreneurial Creativity
    Creating an enterprise with innovative thinking and development.
  • Service/Dedication to a Cause
    The opportunity to pursue work that has meaning and value.
  • Pure Challenge
    A competitive role that allows solving complex problems.
  • Lifestyle
    The opportunity to balance work and home life. 

These anchors are something that a person does not want to give up in their work life. They tend to evolve and strengthen with adult experience. If a job or career does not allow expression of the anchor, it will show up in hobbies or side jobs instead. It’s an important part of career development.